Angebote zu "Tyranny" (9 Treffer)

Tyranny and Music
98,99 € *
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Anbieter: buecher.de
Stand: 17.12.2017
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MUSIC AND NAZISM - ART AND TYRANNY 1933-1945
49,80 € *
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Anbieter: Deutschlands umfa...
Stand: 16.09.2017
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The Courage of Composers and the Tyranny of Tas...
20,49 € *
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(20,49 € / in stock)

The Courage of Composers and the Tyranny of Taste:Reflections on New Music Bálint András Varga

Anbieter: Hugendubel.de
Stand: 11.12.2017
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Music and Nazism
49,80 € *
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Music and NazismArt under Tyranny, 1933-1945Buchvon Michael H. KaterEAN: 9783890075167Einband: GebundenErscheinungsjahr: 2002Sprache: DeutschSeiten: 330Abbildungen: Zahlr. AbbildungenMaße: 247 x 169 x 24 mmRedaktion: Michael H. Kater und Albrecht Rie

Anbieter: RAKUTEN: Ihr Mark...
Stand: 06.12.2017
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The Courage of Composers and the Tyranny of Tas...
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The Courage of Composers and the Tyranny of Taste ab 20.49 EURO Reflections on New Music

Anbieter: eBook.de
Stand: 13.12.2017
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Music and Nazism (Buch)
49,80 € *
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Erscheinungsdatum: 02/2002Medium: BuchEinband: GebundenTitel: Music and NazismTitelzusatz: Art under Tyranny, 1933-1945Redaktion: Kater, Michael H. // Riethmueller, AlbrechtVerlag: Laaber Verlag // Laaber-VerlagSprache: DeutschSchlagworte: Drittes

Anbieter: RAKUTEN: Ihr Mark...
Stand: 03.12.2017
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Various - Acid Jazz - The Story Of 2-CD
19,90 € *
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THE STORY OF ACID JAZZ The underground London club scene of the mild 1980´s was dominated by the sound of ´rare groove´, a DJ term created to describe hard to find jazz-funk music from the ´70s. However by the Summer of 1988 a new sound began to infiltrate the clubs in the form of tripped-out Acid house, and suddenly down tempo dance music found it had nowhere to go. Those who didn´t succumb to house music´s 4/4 tyranny were left with few options - but one did spring up: Acid Jazz... Includes: unique 8-page history of the Acid Jazz label, scene and featured artists.

Anbieter: Bear Family Recor...
Stand: 03.11.2017
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Duet , Hörbuch, Digital, 1, 433min
21,95 € *
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A conqueror´s decree can´t separate Aillil Callaghan from his Scottish heritage. He wears his clan´s forbidden plaid with pride, awaiting the day he becomes Laird, restores his family´s name, and fights to free Scotland from English tyranny. An Englishman in his home? Abomination! Yet the tutor his father engaged for Aillil´s younger brothers may have something to teach the Callaghan heir as well. Violinist and scholar Malcolm Byerly fled Kent in fear, seeking nothing more than a quiet post, eager minds to teach, and for no one to learn his secrets. He didn´t count on his charges´ English-hating barbarian of an older brother, or on red-and-green tartan concealing a kindred soul. A shared love of music breaks down the barriers between two worlds. Aillil´s father threatens their love, but a far more dangerous enemy tears them apart. They vanish into legend. Two centuries later, concert violinist Billy Byerly arrives at Castle Callaghan and feels strangely at home. Legends speak of a Lost Laird who haunts the fortress in wait of his lover´s return. Billy doesn´t believe in legends, ghosts, or love that outlasts life. But the Lost Laird knows his own. First edition published by Torquere Press (2010). 1. Language: English. Narrator: Michael Ferraiuolo. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/acx0/046878de/bk_rhde_002536_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

Anbieter: Audible - Hörbücher
Stand: 22.11.2017
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Edward I
0,87 € *
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On the night of June 17-18, 1239, Queen Eleanor, the consort of Henry III., presented her husband with a son, who was born in the Palace of Westminster, and who was instantly, says the old chronicler, named by the king, Edward, after the glorious king and confessor, whose body rests in the church of St. Peter, immediately adjoining. The event was greeted by the nobles and by the people of London with great manifestations of joy: by the citizens more especially, because the young prince was born among them. The streets of the city were illuminated at night with large lanterns, and music and dancing marked it as a day of general rejoicing. Such a birth was a new thing, in those days, to Englishmen. They had passed nearly two centuries under the dominion of the dukes of Normandy, whose home was in France, and whose sojourns in England were merely visits paid to a conquered territory. During the later years, indeed, of that Norman tyranny, two or three of its princes, though still deeming themselves Normans, had first seen the light on English ground; but now, by his own choice, the reigning king had ordained that his eldest son should receive his birth in the metropolis of his kingdom, and had named him after the lamented and venerated Confessor, the last of the Saxon sovereigns. All this was gratifying to the Anglo-Saxon mind, and how it was received and felt we can discern in a chronicle of the period, which gladly accepts and records the birth of an English or Anglo-Saxon prince, narrating that, on the 14th day of the calends of July (June 18), Eleanor, queen of England, gave birth to her eldest son, Edward; whose father was Henry, whose father was John, whose father was Henry, whose mother was Matilda the empress, whose mother was Matilda, queen of England, whose mother was Margaret, queen of Scotland, whose father was Edward, whose father was Edmund Ironside, who was the son of Ethelred, who was the son of Edgar, who was the son of Edmund, who was the son of Edward the Elder, who was the son of Alfred. In this manner the chronicler, who doubtless gave utterance to a common feeling among Englishmen, manages to drop out of view almost entirely the Norman dukes, who had overrun and subjugated the land for more than one hundred and fifty years, and whose yoke had been felt to be indeed an iron one. Among those sovereigns there had been some men of talent and prowess, and one or two of good and upright intentions; but the general character of their rule had been hard and despotic. The people were oppressed; they rebelled, were subdued, and oppressed again.

Anbieter: ciando eBooks
Stand: 07.11.2017
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