Angebote zu "Identity" (5 Treffer)

Various - Country Québec 1925-1955 (2-CD)
€ 24.95 *
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(Frémaux & Associés) 50 Tracks - 48 page booklet - The History of World Music has enabled us to discover the most unlikely genre - Country Quebec I This boxed edition portrays all the typical aspects of Country Music, but the titles are sung in French. This fusion of the mythical herds led by comboys and the patrimony of French-speaking lands adds to Quebec´s strong identity!

Anbieter: Bear Family Recor...
Stand: Sep 3, 2018
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Triumph of a Time Lord: Regenerating Doctor Who...
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Before Saturday March 26th 2005, Doctor Who had been off the air as a regular, new TV series for more than fifteen years; until a production team led by Russell T. Davies re-imagined the programme so successfully, so triumphantly, that it´s become an instant Christmas tradition, a BAFTA winner, an international ´superbrand´ and a number one rated show. It´s even been credited with reinventing family TV. This is the first full-length book to explore the ´new Who´ phenomenon through to the casting of Matt Smith as the new Doctor. It explores Doctor Who through contemporary debates in TV Studies about quality TV and how can we define TV series as both ´cult´ and ´mainstream´. Further, the book challenges assumptions in focusing on the importance of breath-taking, dramatic moments along with narrative structures, and in analysing the significance of Murray Gold´s music as well as the series´ visual representations. Matt Hills is a lifelong Who fan and he also considers the role of fandom in the show´s return. He investigates too the multi-generic identity, the monster-led format, and the time-travelling brand of BBC Wales´ ´Doctor Who´. In the twenty-first century, TV is changing, but the last of the Time Lords has been more than ready: he´s been fantastic.

Anbieter: trade-a-game
Stand: Oct 15, 2018
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Various - Greetings From - Greetings From Texas
€ 15.95
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€ 12.95 *
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Various Greetings From Texas When Americans meet each other, the first question they usually ask is, ´´Where you from?´´ If the answer is ´New Jersey,´ ´Kansas´ or ´Rhode Island,´ there´s often a polite silence. Followed by a change of subject. But if the answer is ´Texas,´ it´s not unusual to hear some genuine enthusiasm. ´´Really! What´s it like?´´ Like it or not, there is awe surrounding Texas. Sure, it´s big. In fact, it´s almost the biggest state there is. The Sons of Sam Houston probably still haven´t forgiven those upstart Alaskans. But in any case the response you get goes beyond land mass. There´s something about Texas. Texas is a culture. It´s a way of life. People from Texas are not simply average Americans. They´re Texans. There have probably been more movies about Texas than any other state, and as far as music goes….well, just read on. Mind you, not all the qualities associated with Texas are admirable. Like movies and music, there are probably more jokes about Texas than there are about any other state in the union. Texans take a fair amount of ribbing about who they are and what they do. Ribbing, of course, is the least you can expect when your national cuisine is barbeque. Who can count all the jokes about Texans who die, go to Heaven (or Hell) and end up getting barbeque sauce all over the place? One way or another they manage to antagonize the guy in charge. St. Peter complains because there are pickup trucks or empty six packs all over the streets of gold. The Devil complains because a bad day in Hell is ´´like a spring day in Amarillo.´´ And besides, the damned Texans are barbequing on the fires of Hell and have installed air conditioning just in case it really heats up a bit. In short, Texans take their culture with them wherever they travel, including the hereafter. Texans, as well as visitors from more temperate climes, have a lot to say about Texas weather. The heat is a big topic of conversation. Texans pick their parking places by shade, not distance. They know that a seat belt in July does a pretty good imitation of a branding iron. Droughts, too, are a way of life. Texans long ago stopped associating bridges with water. As folks in the country say, ´´It´s so dry the trees are bribin´ the dogs.´´ Just about every quality of Texas life – whether good, bad or indifferent – is on display on this collection. Twenty-five songs telling you a whole lot of what you need to know about Texas and Texans. Here are the things that Texans are proudest of, right along side a few other qualities they may not be quite as proud of, but they sure ain´t ashamed enough to stop writing and singing songs about them. You´d think that a collection like this would consist solely of native Texans singing their pride, but that´s not the case. Admittedly many of these artists hail from Texas – men like Ernest Tubb, Willie Nelson, and Tex Ritter, but there are plenty of exceptions. And speaking of Mr. Ritter, when a guy adopts the name of a state as his first name, you know you´re on to some serious identity issues. And Tex Ritter is just the tip of the iceberg. Think about Tex Williams – who came from Illinois! There just aren´t too many guys out there calling themselves ´Illinois Williams´ or ´New Jersey Jones´ or ´Pennsylvania Smith.´ Along with Williams, there are quite a few non-Texans on this collection proudly singing about the joys and perils of life in the Lone Star state. When you have a guy of Scandinavian ancestry like Ole Rasmussen (whose California-based band was named the Nebraska Cornhuskers) or a Canadian from Nova Scotia singing about Texas, you know there´s something powerful going on. And Hank Snow isn´t the only Canadian on board this train. There´s fellow Nova Scotian Wilf Carter as well. And there are lots of out-of-state Americans like Sanford Clark (Oklahoma), Hank Locklin (Florida), Rex Allen (Arizona), and old Roy Rogers, himself, who hailed from Ohio. Nothing stopped these non-Texans from singing the praises of Texas.

Anbieter: Bear Family Recor...
Stand: Sep 3, 2018
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Bob Dylan - Bringing It All Back Home (180g Edi...
€ 26.95 *
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Exact repro on 180 gram vinyl, with original art and liner notes Rare original mono mix, available for the first time in more than 30 years All-analog mastering from the original master tapes Say the phrase ´Dylan went electric´ to a rock music fan practically anywhere on the globe and they will instantly think of his infamous Newport Folk Festival appearance on July 20, 1965. It has become one of the most oft-told tales in modern musical mythology, with any number of versions depending on the teller. Did the crowd boo Dylan because he dared to plug in or were they merely upset at the short length of the three-song set´ Did Pete Seeger really grab an axe and try to cut the electrical umbilical cord´ Did the crowd even boo at all´ While we´re not likely to get a consensus on these issues, everyone agrees that Dylan signaled a bold new direction that day. Some hated it, many loved it but it forever changed Dylan´s approach to presenting his songs and, because of his unprecedented influence, the course of popular music in general. However, Dylan had already gone electric earlier that year. Returning to Columbia Studios on January 13. 1965 for a three-day recording session, he began work on his fifth album, Bringing It All Back Home. While half of the album would be recorded in his traditional acoustic style, one half would feature the backing of a full rock band. Producer Tom Wilson assembled a sympathetic group of session musicians, including John P. Hammond and Kenny Rankin on guitar, John Sebastian and John Lee on bass and Bobby Gregg on drums. This new, switched-on method was immediately apparent on the album´s opening track, ´Subterranean Homesick Blues.´ A tough, sinewy number, the band drives forward as Bob spits out phrases faster than the listener can interpret them. Hailed as both pre-punk and proto-rap, it reached #39 on the Billboard singles chart, giving Dylan his first Top Forty hit. It was later immortalized in an innovative scene in Don´t Look Back, D.A. Pennebaker´s documentary on Dylan. The tension eases on the next track, ´She Belongs to Me,´ which is practically a blueprint for the Velvet Underground´s quieter moments. The churning blues rocker ´Maggie´s Farm´ ups the ante again, with legions of Dylan watchers struggling to interpret its true meaning. Was it another rejection of the hidebound traditional folk crowd´ Was it a comment on racism, or perhaps an anti-war song´ The answers proved elusive yet seductively compelling. The rollercoaster of emotions continued through the album´s electrified Side One, with Dylan sounding extremely comfortable as a rock front man. The mostly solo acoustic Side Two is no less powerful, though. It opens with one of Dylan´s best-known songs, ´Mr. Tambourine Man.´ This is not the truncated, 4/4 version that the Byrds flew up the pop charts. In its creator´s hands, it is an in-depth character study, revealed through a series of cryptic couplets. At 7:29, ´It´s Alright Ma (I´m Only Bleeding)´ is the side´s epic, a song that Dylan lists among his favorites and one he returns to often in concert. Side Two closes with ´It´s All Over Now, Baby Blue,´ another song left open to intriguing interpretation. Whatever the true identity of ´Baby Blue,´ it became a favorite cover song with versions by the Byrds, the Animals, Joan Baez, the Chocolate Watch Band, the Thirteenth Floor Elevators, the Grateful Dead and many more. Bringing it All Back Home was also significant in that it was the first Dylan album to feature a structured cover portrait rather than a simple artist picture. Shot by photographer Daniel Kramer, it showed Dylan with Sally Grossman, wife of his manager Albert Grossman, lounging in the background, both of them surrounded by a variety of objects. In what would become a common practice, each item in the photograph was scrutinized for its possible meaning: a fallout shelter sign, a copy of Newsweek, cufflinks given to him by Baez, a cat. to the dedicated Dylan fan, it was all significant. Whether they were ´clues´ or just random props matters little in comparison to the groundbreaking album inside the jacket. Dylan was now letting his boot heels wander to beat of his own tambourine and nothing could stop him now. Sundazed is proud to present this seminal album in its rare mono form. It has been sourced directly from the original Columbia analog mono masters to provide a superior listening experience.

Anbieter: Bear Family Recor...
Stand: Sep 3, 2018
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Various - That´ll Flat Git It! - Vol.5 - Rockab...
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€ 13.95 *
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1-CD mit 48-seitigem Booklet, 31 Einzeltitel. Spieldauer ca. 65 Minuten. Rockabilly aus den Archiven von Dot Records, reiner, fünfsterniger, hochklassiger Rockabilly der Fünfzigerjahre. Wir finden, dass Rockabilly auf Compact Discs ganz prima klingt. Also nahmen wir uns 1992 vor, die ultimative Rockabilly-Serie aus der Taufe zu heben, ´´That’ll Flat Git It!´´ Ursprünglich war diese Art von Musik ja etwas zur Veröffentlichung auf Singles, darum bauten wir unsere neue Reihe nach Labels auf und nicht nach Künstlern. Und wir setzten alles daran, dass sie ein Genuss für die Ohren wird – mit einem Knaller nach dem anderen, ergänzt durch etliche Top-Raritäten. Jede einzelne der CDs sollte gewissermaßen eine, wenn möglich, 30-Titel-Musicbox sein, mit den besten Rockabilly-Songs, die jemals für all die legendären Labels aufgenommen worden sind. Wir machten uns auf die Suche nach den am besten klingenden Bändern, ließen sie dann von den führenden Mastering-Spezialisten bearbeiten und haben auch in puncto Verpackung neue Maßstäbe gesetzt. Als übergeordneten Serien-Titel wählten wir ‚ ´´That’ll Flat Git It!´´, das verbale Erkennungszeichen des ersten Rockabilly-Discjockeys Dewey Phillips. Für die Zusammenstellung konnten wir Bill Millar verpflichten, der in den Siebziger- und Achtzigerjahren die klassischen Label-Rockabilly-LPs zusammengestellt hat. Außerdem suchten wir unveröffentlichtes Fotomaterial und machten all jene Interpreten ausfindig, nach denen bis dahin vergeblich geforscht worden war. Unterm Strich steht unsere einzigartige Rockabilly-Serie mit insgesamt 27 Folgen. THAT´LL FLAT GIT IT, VOL. 5 Virtually all of the independent record companies that began life in the late 40s and early 50s have disappeared. It´s true that Atlantic Records is still around as an ongoing concern, and logos like Chess, Specialty and Sun still grace the occasional reissue, but, as the labels´ original owners grew tired of the business or simply went bust, the catalogues were sold. Dot Records for instance has been absorbed and its identity lost in several corporate megadeals. During the 50s and early 60s, the label sold millions and millions of records, although--it must be added--the records on this compilation didn´t do much for Dot´s profit picture. Dot Records was launched in January 1950 by Randy Wood as an offshoot of Randy´s Record Shop, his mail order business in Gallatin, Tennessee, some 30 miles northeast of Nashville. Wood, born in McMinnville, Tennessee, left the U.S. Air Force in 1944 and put his savings into an appliance store. Two years later, he converted his business into a record store, and pioneered mail-order record sales via Gene Nobles´ show on WLAC, Nashville. Wood entered the manufacturing business when Nobles discovered R&B singer Richard Armstrong. The two men co-operated on three labels: Randy´s (on which Armstrong made his debut with Gene Nobles´ Boogie ), Record Shop Special which featured bluesman Cecil Gant, and Dot. Dot really hit its stride when Wood stumbled on the formula of having pop artists like Pat Boone cover R&B and country songs. As early as 1955, Dot had cornered almost 15% of singles sales, and Wood was being courted by ABC who wanted a record division (CBS had Columbia and NBC owned RCA). He held out for the big payday, though, which came in 1957 when Dot was bought by Paramount Pictures for $ 3,000,000. Wood stayed on as head of the company. To his credit, Randy Wood was willing to try anything that he felt had an outside chance of making it. That eclectic approach secured a surprising number of left-field hits, and a good number of flops including LLOYD ´COWBOY´ COPAS´s Circle Rock. I don´t know if Copas habitually broke wind after a skilletful of beans, but the cowboy image was something he fostered. He claimed, for instance, to have been born on a ranch in Oklahoma when, in fact, he came from Blue Creek, Ohio. In 1927 he played with the Hencacklers´ String Band; by 1935 he was half of a duo with fiddler Vernon Storer, and in 1945 he joined Pee Wee King´s Golden West Cowboys. The following year, he became King Records´ first bigtime hillbilly act when he broke through with Filipino Baby, although by 1952, his career had slumped. In an attempt at resuscitation, he dropped the name ´Cowboy´ and turned - at the age of 43 - to rock ´n´ roll, sounding as if he´d invented the music. Circle Rock was written by (cue trumpets) Herb Alpert and Lou Adler; it was one of their earliest recorded

Anbieter: Bear Family Recor...
Stand: Sep 3, 2018
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